A New and an Updated PowerShell Script

NOTE: Updated November 2016 to include -ServersToQuery and -StartTime and parameters.

e.g.

.\RDPConnectionParser.ps1 -ServersToQuery Server1, Server2 -StartTime "November 1"

————————–

Hey everyone, yes I’m still alive!

Connection Report for Remote Desktop 

I wrote a script that connects to one or multiple servers and captures Remote Desktop logons, disconnects, reconnects and logoffs along with the connecting IP:

Download RDPConnectionParser.ps1 here

Recipient Address Report (Formally ProxyAddressCount)

I also updated the “Exchange Proxy Address (alias) Report” script.  It now includes a few environment metrics, as well as the regular CSV-style output:

Download the updated script here

What are the Azure DirSync Cmdlets [Updated]?

ARTICLE UPDATED August 2014 to address the PowerShellConfig module.

NOTE: If you are using Azure AD Connect, see this new article.

As you may have seen, DirSync’s PowerShell functionality can now be called from the “Import-Module” cmdlet instead of running a custom DirSyncConfigShell.psc1 file. If we look at this new module, we can see 92 DirSync-related cmdlets:

DirSync PowerShell Module

Notice the screenshot is actually listing the commands of the “Microsoft.Online.Coexistence.PS.Config module” and “PowerShellConfig” (very descriptive!), not “DirSync”. That is because the DirSync module is a wrapper of sorts, calling “%programfiles% \Windows Azure Active Directory Sync\dirsync\DirSync.psd1” on your behalf. The DirSync module itself contains no cmdlets.

So, what do these cmdlets do anyway? Not all of them are well documented online, so you should start with the help file. Unfortunatley, even the help file omits a synopsis for the 67 “PowerShellConfig” cmdlets.  For the 25 within Microsoft.Online.Coexistence.PS.Config module, run the below command to generate an output similar to the following table:

ipmo DirSync
gcm -m Microsoft.Online.Coexistence.PS.Config | get-help | select name, synopsis | epcsv $env:userprofile\desktop\DirSyncCmdlets.csv -notype


Name

Synopsis

Disable-DirSyncLog

This commandlet is used to disable logging for the Azure Active Directory Sync tool.

Disable-MSOnlineObjectManagement Disable-MSOnlineObjectManagement -Credential <pscredential> [-ObjectTypes <string[]>] [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] [<CommonParameters>]
Disable-MSOnlinePasswordSync Disable-MSOnlinePasswordSync -Credential <pscredential> [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] [<CommonParameters>]
Disable-MSOnlineRichCoexistence Disable-MSOnlineRichCoexistence -Credential <pscredential> [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] [<CommonParameters>]
Disable-OnlinePasswordWriteBack

This commandlet is used to disable writing back user password resets from cloud to onpremise Active Directory.

Disable-PasswordSyncLog

This commandlet is used to disable logging for the Password Sync feature of the Azure Active Directory Sync tool.

Enable-DirSyncLog

This commandlet is used to configure the logging level for the Azure Active Directory Sync tool.

Enable-MSOnlineObjectManagement Enable-MSOnlineObjectManagement -ObjectTypes <string[]> -TargetCredentials <pscredential> -Credential <pscredential> [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] [<CommonParameters>]
Enable-MSOnlinePasswordSync Enable-MSOnlinePasswordSync -Credential <pscredential> [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] [<CommonParameters>]
Enable-MSOnlineRichCoexistence Enable-MSOnlineRichCoexistence -Credential <pscredential> [-WhatIf] [-Confirm] [<CommonParameters>]
Enable-OnlinePasswordWriteBack

This commandlet is used to enable writing back user password resets from cloud to onpremise Active Directory.

Enable-PasswordSyncLog

This commandlet is used to configure the logging level for the Password Sync feature of the Azure Active Directory Sync tool.

Get-CoexistenceConfiguration

Gets a configuration information from the Microsoft Online Coexistence Web Server

Get-DirSyncConfiguration Get-DirSyncConfiguration -TargetCredentials <pscredential> [<CommonParameters>]
Get-DirSyncLogStatus

This commandlet is used to retrieve the current logging level for the Azure Active Directory Sync tool.

Get-OnlinePasswordWriteBackStatus

This commandlet is used to obtain the current status of writing back user password resets from cloud to onpremise Active Directory.

Get-PasswordSyncLogStatus

This commandlet is used to retrieve the current logging level for the Password Sync feature of the Azure Active Directory Sync tool.

Get-PreventAccidentalDeletes

This commandlet is used to retrieve the current status of the object deletion threshold for DirSync.

Set-CoexistenceConfiguration

Configures Microsoft Online Directory Synchronization Tool.

Set-CompanyDirSyncFeatures Set-CompanyDirSyncFeatures -TargetCredentials <pscredential> -FeaturesFlag <int> [<CommonParameters>]
Set-DirSyncConfiguration Set-DirSyncConfiguration -TargetCredentials <pscredential> -DirSyncConfiguration <CloudDirSyncConfiguration> [<CommonParameters>]
Set-FullPasswordSync

Resets the password sync state information forcing a full sync the next time the service is restarted.

Set-PreventAccidentalDeletes

This commandlet is used to enable or disable the object deletion threshold for DirSync.

Start-OnlineCoexistenceSync

Starts synchronization with Microsoft Online

Update-MSOLDirSyncNetworkProxySetting

Updates the directory sync service to use the current user’s http proxy settings.

The de-“magicification” of DirSync is definitely a good thing for all Azure customers.  Having said this, I’d still keep the Codeplex FIM modules around, since they do offer a lot more control of and visibility into the underlying FIM Sync Service.

Here are the cmdlets without help documentation:

 Add-AttributeFlowMapping
 Add-ConfigurationParameter
 Add-ConnectorAnchorConstructionSettings
 Add-ConnectorAttributeInclusion
 Add-ConnectorFilter
 Add-ConnectorHierarchyProvisioningMapping
 Add-ConnectorObjectInclusion
 Add-RelationshipConditionGrouping
 Add-RunStep
 Add-SynchronizationConditionGrouping
 Disable-ConnectorPartition
 Disable-ConnectorPartitionHierarchy
 Enable-ConnectorPartition
 Enable-ConnectorPartitionHierarchy
 Export-ServerConfiguration
 Get-AADConnectorPasswordResetConfiguration
 Get-ConfigurationParameter
 Get-Connector
 Get-ConnectorHierarchyProvisioningDNComponent
 Get-ConnectorHierarchyProvisioningMapping
 Get-ConnectorHierarchyProvisioningObjectClass
 Get-ConnectorPartition
 Get-ConnectorPartitionHierarchy
 Get-ConnectorTypes
 Get-GlobalSettings
 Get-PasswordHashSyncConfiguration
 Get-RunProfile
 Get-Schema
 Get-SynchronizationRule
 Import-MIISServerConfig
 Import-ServerConfiguration
 Initialize-Connector
 Initialize-RunProfile
 Initialize-SynchronizationRule
 New-Connector
 New-RunProfile
 New-SynchronizationRule
 Remove-AADConnectorPasswordResetConfiguration
 Remove-AttributeFlowMapping
 Remove-ConfigurationParameter
 Remove-Connector
 Remove-ConnectorAnchorConstructionSettings
 Remove-ConnectorAttributeInclusion
 Remove-ConnectorFilter
 Remove-ConnectorHierarchyProvisioningMapping
 Remove-ConnectorObjectInclusion
 Remove-PasswordHashSyncConfiguration
 Remove-RelationshipConditionGrouping
 Remove-RunProfile
 Remove-RunStep
 Remove-SynchronizationConditionGrouping
 Remove-SynchronizationRule
 Set-AADConnectorPasswordResetConfiguration
 Set-ConfigurationParameter
 Set-Connector
 Set-GlobalSettings
 Set-MIISADMAConfiguration
 Set-MIISECMA2Configuration
 Set-MIISExtMAConfiguration
 Set-MIISFIMMAConfiguration
 Set-PasswordHashSyncConfiguration
 Set-ProvisioningRulesExtension
 Set-RunProfile
 Set-Schema
 Set-SynchronizationRule
 Update-ConnectorPartition
 Update-ConnectorSchema

As time allows, I will return with more detail on each of the above DirSync cmdlets; so long for now!

Backup and Restore Instructions for the DirSync Database

Today, Microsoft released a 9 page guide on backing up and restoring the Microsoft Azure Active Directory Sync tool. You can get it here.

Some things to keep in mind:

  • This guide applies to DirSync when used with the full version of SQL only.  This means it does not apply to most installations.
  • You don’t need to backup or restore DirSync.  If you simply install a new instance and configure it appropriately, the objects will re-sync.  Doing a backup/restore can save time however, if you have a very large number of users (I wouldn’t bother with less than 100k).
  • Ironically, this guide doesn’t actually tell you how to backup or restore the database.  You need some SQL-aware backup product to do that.  Instead, this guide helps you make use of a restored database in a DirSync environment (working with miisclient.exe, handling keys, etc).

DirSync 1.0.6593.0012

Late Monday, Microsoft released another update to the DirSync software, this time with a build number of 6593.0012. You can download it in from the usual link.

DirSync 1.0.6593.0012

As with previous DirSync updates, there has been no official announcement of the release, however the “use at your own risk” Wiki does mention one of the new features:

Version 6593.0012
Date Released 2/3/2014
Notable Changes

New features:

  • Additional Attributes are synchronized on User and Contact objects

Attributes documented here

The new attributes referenced in the link are userCertificate and userSMIMECertificate. Interestingly pwdLastSet was also added, however there is no mention of that one in the article. These additions serve an unknown purpose for now, however one might speculate that they are in support of new capabilities soon to be available in the service?!

Before you upgrade, you may wish to get a “before and after” review of the attribute inclusion list. The best way to review this is in the “Configure Attribute Flow” area of each management agent. At the end of this post, I have also shared an experimental PowerShell method of getting this information.

It is noteworthy that the author of this update, a Microsoft Program Manager for DirSync, is linking to yet another community wiki page instead of the seemingly defunct Knowledge Base article KB-2256198. Sadly, it would appear that the crumbling integrity of the TechNet/Support documentation may be latest casualty in a growing list of IT Pro-related cuts Microsoft has made along their quest to the cloud…

<#
Description:
This script counts and dumps the attribute inclusion lists from each MA.
It does not evaluate attribute flow or applicable object types.

February 3 2014
Mike Crowley
http://mikecrowley.us
#>

#Import Modules
Import-Module SQLps -WarningAction SilentlyContinue

#Get SQL Info
$SQLServer = (gp 'HKLM:SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\FIMSynchronizationService\Parameters').Server
if ($SQLServer.Length -eq '0') {$SQLServer = $env:computername}
$SQLInstance = (gp 'HKLM:SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\FIMSynchronizationService\Parameters').SQLInstance
$MSOLInstance = ($SQLServer + "\" + $SQLInstance)

#Get Management Agent Attribute Info
[xml]$OnPremAttributes = (Invoke-Sqlcmd -MaxCharLength 10000 -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query "SELECT attribute_inclusion_xml FROM [FIMSynchronizationService].[dbo].[mms_management_agent] WHERE [ma_name] = 'Active Directory Connector'").attribute_inclusion_xml
[xml]$CloudAttributes = (Invoke-Sqlcmd -MaxCharLength 10000 -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query "SELECT attribute_inclusion_xml FROM [FIMSynchronizationService].[dbo].[mms_management_agent] WHERE [ma_name] = 'Windows Azure Active Directory Connector'").attribute_inclusion_xml
$ADAttributes = $OnPremAttributes.'attribute-inclusion'.attribute
$AzureAttributes = $CloudAttributes.'attribute-inclusion'.attribute

#Output to Screen
Write-Host $ADAttributes.count "Attributes synced from AD to the Metaverse" -F Cyan
Write-Host $AzureAttributes.count "Attributes synced from the Metaverse to Azure" -F Cyan
Write-Host "See" $env:TEMP\DirSyncAttributeList.txt "for detail" -F Cyan

#Output to File
"******AD Attributes******" | Out-File $env:TEMP\DirSyncAttributeList.txt
$ADAttributes | Out-File $env:TEMP\DirSyncAttributeList.txt -Append
" "| Out-File $env:TEMP\DirSyncAttributeList.txt -Append
"******Azure Attributes******" | Out-File $env:TEMP\DirSyncAttributeList.txt -Append
$AzureAttributes | Out-File $env:TEMP\DirSyncAttributeList.txt -Append

##END

DirSync 1.0.6567.0018 Has Been Released

As some of us noticed, last week, Microsoft quietly removed the latest version of DirSync without so much as a tweet explaining why. Word on the street is that there were issues in the “Export” stage in the synchronization process (see KB 2906832). Today it would appear those issues have been resolved, as v1.0.6567.0018 just hit the web. You can download it here, though I’d advise caution, given Microsoft’s approach to communicating (lack-thereof) bugs.

As stated in the updated Wiki, the following improvements exist in this version:

New features:

  • DirSync can be installed on a Domain Controller (must log-off/log-on AFTER installation and BEFORE configuration wizard)
    • Documentation on how to deploy can be found here

Contains fixes for:

  • Sync Engine memory leak issue
  • Sync Engine export issue (FIM 2010 R2 hotfix 4.1.3493.0)
  • “Staging-Error” during large Confirming Imports from Windows Azure Active Directory
  • password sync behavior when sync’ing from Read-Only Domain Controllers (RODC)
  • DirSync setup behavior for domains with ‘@’ symbol in NetBois names
  • Fix for Hybrid Deployment Configuration-time error:
    • EventID=0
    • Description like “Enable-MsOnlineRichCoexistence failed. Error: Log entry string is too long.  A string written to the event log cannot exceed 32766 characters.”

Upgrading DirSync to the Latest Version

EDIT (Nov. 22 2013): DirSync 1.0.6567.0018 Has Been Released

EDIT (Nov. 11 2013): DirSync 1.0.6553.2 has been removed from Microsoft’s download site and version history comment removed from the Wiki.  Not sure why.

Early this morning, Microsoft released an updated version of Windows Azure Active Directory Sync tool (DirSync to you and me). Version 1.0.6553.2 (or later) can be downloaded from the usual link. It comes with 4 known improvements:

  1. Fix to address Sync Engine memory leak
  2. Fix to address “staging-error” during full import from Azure Active Directory
  3. Fix to handle Read-Only Domain Controllers in Password Sync
  4. DirSync can be installed on a Domain Controller. Documentation on how to deploy can be found here.

I am most excited about #4, as this enables me to build more interesting labs from my laptop, now that I don’t need a dedicated “DirSync Server”. You should note however, this is recommended only for “development” environments. After some further testing, I’d consider recommending this configuration for shops with multiple domain controllers and 50 or fewer users.

If you’re already running DirSync, and want to upgrade, you’re likely in one of two camps:

  1. You want to move DirSync from a dedicated server to a DC.
  2. You don’t want to move the DirSync server to a DC (or elsewhere), you just want the latest version.

If you’re in the first scenario, I’m going to assume you’re working in a lab or very small environment. This means you don’t need to worry about a lengthy synchronization process, and can easily take advantage of the built-in soft-match capability of the product. Your upgrade process is easy:

  1. Throw away your existing DirSync server.
  2. Install Dirsync on a DC.
  3. Run the Directory Sync Configuration Wizard

As soon as you finish the 3rd step, the initial synchronization will rebuild the database (and re-sync passwords), returning to where you left off!

NOTE: If you’re a big shop, you should consider that a full sync takes roughly 1 hour per 5,000 objects synced, according to a recent webcast by Lucas Costa. Soft-matches would likely go faster, but you’ve been warned…

Now, if you’re just looking to upgrade your version of DirSync to the latest version, you need to first ensure you are running versoin 6385.0012 or later. In-place upgrades aren’t supported on earlier versions. If this is you, refer to the soft-match advice I gave above. This is your upgrade path.

For those that are running 6385.0012 or later, upgrading is as simple as a few clicks of the mouse. For the nervous, here are some screenshots:

NOTE: The installer detects an existing installation.
This is the default path, but it should reflect your installation directory.
Hmm, that’s not good! Fortunately a reboot cleared this up for me, but if you’re not so lucky, you can examine the following logs:
  • coexistenceSetup
  • dirsyncSetup
  • miissetup
  • MSOIDCRLSetup

…which are located in the earlier discussed installation directory.

msiexec returned 1618
Much better!
For an upgrade, you’ll want to run this right away, since not doing so leaves you without a functioning DirSync server.
Global Office 365 Administrator credentials go here. This is stored on your DirSync server, so make sure PasswordNeverExpires attribute is set to $true on the Office 365 account (or your on-premises account, if you’re using a federated user)
On-Premises Enterprise Admin credentials go here:
Checking this box allows some attributes to be written back to your Active Directory, which is necessary for a Hybrid Exchange Server scenario.
Enable Password Sync… or Don’t.
NOTE: Upgrades and new installs require a Full Sync.
This post wouldn’t be complete without a plug for my free DirSync Report script! DirSync Report

DirSync and Disabled Users: The BlockCredential Attribute [Part 2]

In this two-part article, I have laid out a scenario in which DirSync sets the Azure “BlockCredential” attribute of disabled Active Directory users. In Part 1, I explained how the Windows Azure Active Directory Sync tool (DirSync) causes this to happen. Part 2 (below) discusses how to change this behavior.


Last time, we saw that magic a rules extension prevents a user from logging into Office 365 if their on-premises Active Directory account was disabled. Below, I’ll show you how to override this attribute flow, but first a note on Microsoft Support:

NOTE: Changing the behavior of DirSync means that you may wander into “unsupported” terrain, but in my experience, unless an unsupported change is likely the cause for a given problem, Microsoft’s support staff have been understanding and have yet to terminate a support case without cause. Having said this, you should not expect Microsoft to incorporate your changes into their upgrade path, so be sure to document, backup, and plan upgrades accordingly.

As you’ll recall, the existing attribute flow is:

userAccountControl à Rules Extension à accountEnabled à Metaverse
Metaverse à accountEnabled à BlockCredential

We will adjust it to the following:

userAccountControl à Rules Extension à accountEnabled à Metaverse à <Nowhere>

In essence, we are allowing the rules extension to update the Metaverse, but not allowing the Azure MA to flow to the BlockedCredential attribute.  This ensures changes in the on-premises Active Directory (such as disabling accounts) will not prevent login to Office 365 (be sure this is actually what you want before you proceed).  Fortunately it also does not necessarily prevent an administrator from setting BlockedCredential manually on Office 365 users.

With our game plan, let’s begin by firing up the trusty miisclient.exe; usually located here:

C:\Program Files\Windows Azure Active Directory Sync\SYNCBUS\Synchronization Service\UIShell\miisclient.exe 

1) Click Management Agents.
2) Open the “Windows Azure Active Directory Connector” MA.
3) Click “Configure Attribute Flow” and expand “Object Type: User”.
4) Select the accountEnabled attribute.
5) Click “Delete”.

6) Click “OK” until you are back on the main screen.

 

We’re almost done!  Two tasks remain:

  1. Test our change by:
    • Creating a new AD user, ensure they sync to Office 365 and that they can log in
    • Disable the user’s AD account, run another sync and ensure they can still log in.
  2. Determine how to update users that were disabled before our change.  If you simply want to re/enable all currently disabled accounts, the below PowerShell sample might work well:
Connect-MsolService
$BlockedUsers = Get-MsolUser -EnabledFilter DisabledOnly -All
$i= 1
$BlockedUsers | ForEach-Object {
 Write-Host ($_.UserPrincipalName + " (" + $i + " of " + $BlockedUsers.count + ")" )
 Set-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UserPrincipalName -BlockCredential $false
 $i = $i + 1
 }

Thanks to William Yang for his advice on this post.

DirSync and Disabled Users: The BlockCredential Attribute [Part 1]

In this two-part article, I will describe a scenario in which DirSync sets the Azure “BlockCredential” attribute of disabled Active Directory users. In Part 1 (below) I explain how the Windows Azure Active Directory Sync tool (DirSync) causes this to happen. Part 2 discusses how to change this behavior.

As I’ve been discussing, DirSync can be more complicated than it appears. Even if you are familiar with the miisclient.exe console, some of FIM’s logic is hidden in “Rules Extension” DLL files such as “MSONLINE.RulesExt.dll“. These files can be reverse-engineered to some degree, however it can be very difficult.

That’s why it’s good to know you can avoid them all together if necessary! For example, imagine that I don’t want DirSync to prevent my disabled users from logging into Office 365. Perhaps you need to limit access to on-premises resources for a group of people, while still allowing everyone access to Office 365.

If this restricted group is only a handful of users, and you don’t need password synchronization, you might be best off creating them manually within the Office 365 portal. However if automation and password sync are important, this scenario presents a few credentialing challenges:

  • Because ADFS authenticates against local domain controllers, the accounts Must be enabled.
  • DirSync will sync passwords for disabled users, but as mentioned above, it also disables them in Office 365 (by setting their BlockCredential attribute).

The first bullet point is simply how ADFS works, therefore ADFS is out. This 2nd option, however, can actually be explored. WHY does DirSync do this? As far as I can tell, Microsoft hasn’t documented this part of the attribute flow, so let’s take a look ourselves.

Launch miisclient.exe and select the Management Agents tab. Double-click the “Active Directory Connector” MA and select “Configure Attribute Flow”, then expand to this section:

What we can see here is that FIM is reading the Active Directory attribute “userAccountControl” (where the disabled state is recorded) and updating the “Metaverse” attribute “accountEnabled” based on logic within the rules extension. For the sake of argument, why don’t we call this rules extension “magic”, because I have no idea what’s inside it – but let’s keep going.

Now let’s look at the “Windows Azure Active Directory Connector” MA in the same spot:

Well, that’s pretty simple. It’s taking the accountEnabled attribute OUT of the Metaverse and sending it to Azure. The type “Direct” means no magic. After some testing, I have determined that this attribute directly toggles the BlockCredential attribute I mentioned earlier.

userAccountControl à Magic à accountEnabled à Metaverse

Metaverse à accountEnabled  à BlockCredential

(AD / Azure)

Clear as mud, right? J

Here’s an example to be sure:

1) A user has just been disabled.
2) Later, DirSync runs, updating the “userAccountControl” value in the AD MA.

3) The magic within the rule extension reads this and decides the “accountEnabled” Metaverse attribute needs to be updated to “false” which is then exported to Azure.

4) More magic within Azure, decides the user’s BlockCredential attribute needs to be updated. You can view this in the Office 365 Admin Portal or within PowerShell.
5) The user can no longer log into Office 365.Note: This behavior is described in KB 2742372  It looks like your account has been blocked

As you can see, this won’t work in our scenario. Fortunately, FIM is very flexible and we can change this behavior!

Continue on to Part 2 if you’d like to see how.

System Center 2012 R2 Evaluation Virtual Machines

Today, Microsoft published 7 System Center eval VHDs.  If they are anything like the 2012 versions, they are great and very easy to deploy, with a wizard automatically configuring them into your environment!

Check `em out:

Additional Reading: What’s New in System Center 2012 R2

Sample setup screen:

SCOM Evaluation VHD Setup Screen

Dirsync: Determine if Password Sync is Enabled

For those not interested in the complete DirSync Report I published last week, now you can run just the Password Hash Sync portion, in a script I published here: Dirsync: Determine if Password Sync is Enabled.

For deployments with remote SQL installations: As with the previous report, note that we make use of the SQL PowerShell Module, which must be present on the computer.

Sample Output(s)

DirSync “Busted Users” Report

If you administer DirSync for your organization, you likely have seen emails like this, indicating some of your users didn’t sync.

DirSync Error Email

It can be a frustrating email, since the “error description” is for some reason blank and the “On-premises object ID” column is not something that’s easy to correlate to a user account within your Active Directory. There are also application event log entries (FIMSynchronizationService #6111 and Directory Synchronization #0), but again these aren’t exactly rich with detail.

Many of you know that DirSync is actually a customized installation FIM 2010 R2’s Synchronization Service. Within the miisclient.exe console, you can look at your most recent “Export” job and examine the errors one at a time.

Miisclient.exe Console


(By the way, this is actually the place to go if you wanted to configure filtering for directory synchronization.)

Using this console certainly works, but it’s not an efficient way to resolve errors. Microsoft seems to acknowledge this, but falls short of a fix with that email, in my opinion. Instead of wearing out your mouse, I propose you use the PowerShell script I have written below. Within, I leverage the free FimSyncPowerShellModule which you’ll need to download and copy to:

…\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules\FimSyncPowerShellModule\FimSyncPowerShellModule.psm1

Once you’ve copied the module, you’re ready to run the report, which can be downloaded here.

Here is a sample output, followed by the code itself.

Sample Output

<#
Description:
This script generates a list of users who are failing to export to Azure AD.

This script makes use of the FimSyncPowerShellModule
https://fimpowershellmodule.codeplex.com/
(Download and copy to C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules\FimSyncPowerShellModule\FimSyncPowerShellModule.psm1)

October 18 2013
Mike Crowley
http://mikecrowley.us
#>

#Import the FimSyncPowerShellModule Module
ipmo FimSyncPowerShellModule

#Get the last export run
$LastExportRun = (Get-MIIS_RunHistory -MaName 'Windows Azure Active Directory Connector' -RunProfile 'Export')[0]

#Get error objects from last export run (user errors only)
$UserErrorObjects = $LastExportRun | Get-RunHistoryDetailErrors | ? {$_.dn -ne $null}

$ErrorFile = @()

#Build the custom Output Object
$UserErrorObjects | % {
 $TmpCSObject = Get-MIIS_CSObject -ManagementAgent 'Windows Azure Active Directory Connector' -DN $_.DN
 [xml]$UserXML = $TmpCSObject.UnappliedExportHologram
 $MyObject = New-Object PSObject -Property @{
 EmailAddress = (Select-Xml -Xml $UserXML -XPath "/entry/attr" | select -expand node | ? {$_.name -eq 'mail'}).value
 UPN = (Select-Xml -Xml $UserXML -XPath "/entry/attr" | select -expand node | ? {$_.name -eq 'userPrincipalName'}).value
 ErrorType = $_.ErrorType
 DN = $_.DN
 }
 $ErrorFile += $MyObject
 }

$FileName = "$env:TMP\ErrorList-{0:yyyyMMdd-HHmm}" -f (Get-Date) + ".CSV"
$ErrorFile | select UPN, EmailAddress, ErrorType, DN | epcsv $FileName -NoType

#Output to the screen
$ErrorFile | select UPN, EmailAddress, ErrorType, DN

Write-Host
Write-Host $ErrorFile.count "users with errors. See here for a list:" -F Yellow
Write-Host $FileName -F Yellow
Write-Host

DirSync Report

Azure Active Directory Sync (DirSync) seems so simple on the surface doesn’t it?  “Next, Next, Finish”, right?  Ha!  If you’ve ever had to revisit your DirSync server to troubleshoot or make a configuration change, you know there can be more than meets the eye.  A lot of useful information happens to be scattered across various registry keys, SQL tables and XML files.  If you’re not familiar with the FIM Management Console, and these other locations it might be hard to see what’s going on.

Here’s a free script that aims to help by creating a dashboard highlighting useful DirSync configurations.  See the image below for a sample output.  Before you run it you should be aware of the limitations listed in the “known issues” area of the script.

Oct 2014 Update: Fellow MVP, Michael Van Horenbeeck has written an update to this script for use with the new Azure AD Sync Tool.  Please be sure to check it out here: http://vanhybrid.com/2014/10/26/azure-ad-sync-tool-html-report/

DirSync Report


You can Review the script below or download it and try it for yourself!

&lt;#
Description:
This script gathers DirSync information from various locations and reports to the screen.

November 5 2013
Mike Crowley
http://mikecrowley.us

Known Issues:
1) All commands, including SQL queries run as the local user.  This may cause issues on locked-down SQL deployments.
2) For remote SQL installations, the SQL PowerShell module must be installed on the dirsync server.
    (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh231683.aspx)
3) The Azure Service account field is actually just the last account to use the Sign In Assistant.
    There are multiple entries at that registry location.  We're just taking the last one.
4) Assumes Dirsync version 6385.0012 or later.

#&gt;

#Console Prep
cls
Write-Host &quot;Please wait...&quot; -F Yellow
ipmo SQLps

#Check for SQL Module
if ((gmo sqlps) -eq $null) {
    write-host &quot;The SQL PowerShell Module Is Not loaded.  Please install and try again&quot; -F Red
    write-host &quot;http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh231683.aspx&quot; -F Red
    Write-Host &quot;Quitting...&quot; -F Red; sleep 5; Break
    }

#Get Dirsync Registry Info
$DirsyncVersion = (gp 'hklm:SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\Microsoft Online Directory Sync').DisplayVersion
$DirsyncPath = (gp 'hklm:SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSOLCoExistence').InstallPath
$FullSyncNeededBit = (gp 'hklm:SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSOLCoExistence').FullSyncNeeded
$FullSyncNeeded = &quot;No&quot;
If ((gp 'hklm:SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSOLCoExistence').FullSyncNeeded -eq '1') {$FullSyncNeeded = &quot;Yes&quot;}

#Get SQL Info
$SQLServer = (gp 'HKLM:SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\FIMSynchronizationService\Parameters').Server
if ($SQLServer.Length -eq '0') {$SQLServer = $env:computername}
$SQLInstance = (gp 'HKLM:SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\FIMSynchronizationService\Parameters').SQLInstance
$MSOLInstance = ($SQLServer + &quot;\&quot; + $SQLInstance)
$SQLVersion = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query &quot;SELECT SERVERPROPERTY('productversion'), SERVERPROPERTY ('productlevel'), SERVERPROPERTY ('edition')&quot;

#Get Password Sync Status
[xml]$ADMAxml = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query &quot;SELECT [ma_id] ,[ma_name] ,[private_configuration_xml] FROM [FIMSynchronizationService].[dbo].[mms_management_agent]&quot; | ? {$_.ma_name -eq 'Active Directory Connector'} | select -Expand private_configuration_xml
$PasswordSyncBit = (Select-Xml -XML $ADMAxml -XPath &quot;/adma-configuration/password-hash-sync-config/enabled&quot; | select -expand node).'#text'
$PasswordSyncStatus = &quot;Disabled&quot;
If ($PasswordSyncBit -eq '1') {$PasswordSyncStatus = &quot;Enabled&quot;}

#Get Account Info
$ServiceAccountGuess = (((gci 'hkcu:Software\Microsoft\MSOIdentityCRL\UserExtendedProperties' | select PSChildName)[-1]).PSChildName -split ':')[-1]
$ADServiceAccountUser = $ADMAxml.'adma-configuration'.'forest-login-user'
$ADServiceAccountDomain = $ADMAxml.'adma-configuration'.'forest-login-domain'
$ADServiceAccount = $ADServiceAccountDomain + &quot;\&quot; + $ADServiceAccountUser

#Get DirSync Database Info
$SQLDirSyncInfo = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query &quot;SELECT DB_NAME(database_id) AS DatabaseName, Name AS Logical_Name, Physical_Name, (size*8)/1024 SizeMB FROM sys.master_files WHERE DB_NAME(database_id) = 'FIMSynchronizationService'&quot;
$DirSyncDB = $SQLDirSyncInfo | ? {$_.Logical_Name -eq 'FIMSynchronizationService'}
$DirSyncLog = $SQLDirSyncInfo | ? {$_.Logical_Name -eq 'FIMSynchronizationService_log'}

#Get connector space info (optional)
$ADMA = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query &quot;SELECT [ma_id] ,[ma_name] FROM [FIMSynchronizationService].[dbo].[mms_management_agent] WHERE ma_name = 'Active Directory Connector'&quot;
$AzureMA = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query &quot;SELECT [ma_id] ,[ma_name] FROM [FIMSynchronizationService].[dbo].[mms_management_agent] WHERE ma_name = 'Windows Azure Active Directory Connector'&quot;
$UsersFromBothMAs = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query &quot;SELECT [ma_id] ,[rdn] FROM [FIMSynchronizationService].[dbo].[mms_connectorspace] WHERE object_type = 'user'&quot;
$AzureUsers = $UsersFromBothMAs | ? {$_.ma_id -eq $AzureMA.ma_id}
$ADUsers = $UsersFromBothMAs | ? {$_.ma_id -eq $ADMA.ma_id}

#Get DirSync Run History
$SyncHistory = Invoke-Sqlcmd -ServerInstance $MSOLInstance -Query &quot;SELECT [step_result] ,[end_date] ,[stage_no_change] ,[stage_add] ,[stage_update] ,[stage_rename] ,[stage_delete] ,[stage_deleteadd] ,[stage_failure] FROM [FIMSynchronizationService].[dbo].[mms_step_history]&quot; | sort end_date -Descending

#GetDirSync interval (3 hours is default)
$SyncTimeInterval = (Select-Xml -Path ($DirsyncPath + &quot;Microsoft.Online.DirSync.Scheduler.exe.config&quot;) -XPath &quot;configuration/appSettings/add&quot; | select -expand Node).value

#Generate Output
cls

Write-Host &quot;Report Info&quot; -F DarkGray
Write-Host &quot;Date: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host (Get-Date) -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Server: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host  $env:computername -F DarkCyan
Write-Host

Write-Host &quot;Account Info&quot; -F DarkGray
Write-Host &quot;Active Directory Service Account: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $ADServiceAccount -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Azure Service Account Guess: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $ServiceAccountGuess -F DarkCyan
Write-Host

Write-Host &quot;DirSync Info&quot; -F DarkGray
Write-Host &quot;Version: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $DirsyncVersion -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Path: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $DirsyncPath -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Password Sync Status: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $PasswordSyncStatus -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Sync Interval (H:M:S): &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $SyncTimeInterval -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Full Sync Needed? &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $FullSyncNeeded -F DarkCyan
Write-Host

Write-Host &quot;User Info&quot; -F DarkGray
Write-Host &quot;Users in AD connector space: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $ADUsers.count -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Users in Azure connector space: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $AzureUsers.count -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Total Users: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $UsersFromBothMAs.count -F DarkCyan
Write-Host

Write-Host &quot;SQL Info &quot; -F DarkGray
Write-Host &quot;Version: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-host $SQLVersion.Column1 $SQLVersion.Column2 $SQLVersion.Column3 -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Instance: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host  $MSOLInstance -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Database Location: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $DirSyncDB.Physical_Name -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Database Size: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $DirSyncDB.SizeMB &quot;MB&quot; -F DarkCyan
Write-Host &quot;Database Log Size: &quot; -F Cyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host $DirSyncLog.SizeMB &quot;MB&quot; -F DarkCyan
Write-Host

Write-Host &quot;Most Recent Sync Activity&quot; -F DarkGray
Write-Host &quot;(For more detail, launch:&quot; $DirsyncPath`SYNCBUS\Synchronization Service\UIShell\miisclient.exe&quot;)&quot; -F DarkGray
Write-Host &quot;  &quot; ($SyncHistory[0].end_date).ToLocalTime() -F DarkCyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host &quot; --&quot; $SyncHistory[0].step_result -F Gray
Write-Host &quot;  &quot; ($SyncHistory[1].end_date).ToLocalTime() -F DarkCyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host &quot; --&quot; $SyncHistory[1].step_result -F Gray
Write-Host &quot;  &quot; ($SyncHistory[2].end_date).ToLocalTime() -F DarkCyan -NoNewline ; Write-Host &quot; --&quot; $SyncHistory[2].step_result -F Gray
Write-Host

Converting SMTP Proxy Addresses to Lowercase

Update: Be aware, this script has not been tested with SIP, X400 or other address types. I am working on an update to validate these scenarios, but in the meantime, proceed at your own risk with these address types.

I recently encountered a question in an online forum where someone asked for a script to convert all of their user’s email addresses to lower case values.  While this doesn’t affect the message delivery, it can have an impact on aesthetics when the address is displayed in an external recipient’s email client.  An Exchange Email Address Policy can do this to some degree, but I wanted to see how it could be done with PowerShell.

The challenge with a script like this is twofold:

  1. Email addresses (proxy addresses) are a multi-valued attribute, which can be tricky to work with.
  2. PowerShell is generally not case-sensitive, and therefore when we try to rename Mr. Gallalee’s email address in the screenshot below, we can see that it does not work:

WARNING: The command completed successfully but no settings of 'demolab.local/Users/Rob Gallalee' have been modified.

After a little bit of inspiration from a script written by Michael B Smith, I came up with the below:


$MailboxList = Get-Mailbox  -ResultSize unlimited

$MailboxList | % {

$LoweredList = @()
$RenamedList = @()

foreach ($Address in $_.EmailAddresses){
if ($Address.prefixstring -eq "SMTP"){
$RenamedList += $Address.smtpaddress + "TempRename"
$LoweredList += $Address.smtpaddress.ToLower()
}
}
Set-mailbox $_ -emailaddresses $RenamedList -EmailAddressPolicyEnabled $false
Set-mailbox $_ -emailaddresses $LoweredList

#Without this line the "Reply To" Address could be lost on recipients with more than one proxy address:
Set-mailbox $_ -PrimarySmtpAddress $_.PrimarySmtpAddress
}

This script works as follows:

  1. Puts all mailboxes into the $MailboxList variable.  If you don’t want all mailboxes,  edit the Get-Mailbox cmdlet as you see fit.
  2. Filters out X400 and other non-SMTP addresses.
  3. Creates an array called $RenamedList which stores each proxy address with “TempRename” appended to it (e.g. Rgallalee@demolab.localTempRename).
  4. Creates another array ($LoweredList) and use the “ToLower” method on each proxy address.
  5. Sets the proxy address for the user to the value of $RenamedList and then to $LoweredList.
    1. This is how we get around the case case insensitivity – name it to something else and then name it back.
  6. Step 4 and 5 don’t preserve the “Primary” / “Reply-To” address, so we set it back manually with the last line.

Note: This script turns off the email address policy for each user.

As always, feedback is welcome.

EDIT Dec 2018:
This is a similar approach, but for mailboxes migrated to Office 365. In this case, only the Primary SMTP addresses are targeted.

It may also be faster than the above, due to the fact we’re only operating against mailboxes that have uppercase (vs all of them).

Set-ADServerSettings -ViewEntireForest:$true

$TargetObjects = Get-RemoteMailbox -ResultSize Unlimited | Where {$_.PrimarySmtpAddress.ToLower() -cne $_.PrimarySmtpAddress}

Write-Host $TargetObjects.count "Remote mailboxes have one or more uppercase characters." -ForegroundColor Cyan

#Backup First
Function Get-FileFriendlyDate {Get-Date -format ddMMMyyyy_HHmm.s}
$DesktopPath = ([Environment]::GetFolderPath("Desktop") + '\')
$LogPath = ($DesktopPath + (Get-FileFriendlyDate) + "-UppercaseBackup.xml")

$TargetObjects | select DistinguishedName, PrimarySMTPAddress, EmailAddresses | Export-Clixml $LogPath
Write-Host "A backup XML has been placed here:" $LogPath -ForegroundColor Cyan
Write-Host

$Counter = $TargetObjects.Count

foreach ($RemoteMailbox in $TargetObjects) {

    Write-Host "Setting: " -ForegroundColor DarkCyan -NoNewline
    Write-Host $RemoteMailbox.PrimarySmtpAddress -ForegroundColor Cyan
    Write-Host "Remaining: " -ForegroundColor DarkCyan -NoNewline
    Write-Host $Counter -ForegroundColor Cyan

    Set-RemoteMailbox $RemoteMailbox.Identity -PrimarySmtpAddress ("TMP-Rename-" + $RemoteMailbox.PrimarySmtpAddress) -EmailAddressPolicyEnabled $false
    Set-RemoteMailbox $RemoteMailbox.Identity -EmailAddresses @{remove = $RemoteMailbox.PrimarySmtpAddress}

    Set-RemoteMailbox $RemoteMailbox.Identity -PrimarySmtpAddress $RemoteMailbox.PrimarySmtpAddress.ToLower()
    Set-RemoteMailbox $RemoteMailbox.Identity -EmailAddresses @{remove = ("TMP-Rename-" + $RemoteMailbox.PrimarySmtpAddress)}

    $Counter --
}

Write-Host
Write-Host "Done." -ForegroundColor DarkCyan

#End

 

Exchange Proxy Address (alias) Report

EDIT (April 4 2015):

This script has been updated significantly, please make sure you’re using version 5.

————–

Exchange Server stores user’s alternate email addresses as a multi-valued attribute within Active Directory.  For example, if my colleague Jorge has jdiaz@demolab.local as well as diazj@demolab.local, his proxyAddresses attribute would look like this:

ADUC - ProxyAddresses

Notice, the capital SMTP vs. the lowercase smtp.  There can be only one uppercase SMTP, and this represents the primary, or “reply to” address.

While, it’s very easy to view someone’s proxy addresses (often called aliases, but don’t confuse it with the “alias” attribute) within the Exchange Management Console, it can be tough to work with in the Exchange Management Shell (PowerShell) due to the data being stored as a  “Multi-Valued” attribute.  The usual “Get-Mailbox” output not only shows all addresses as a single item, but in the case “mcrowley” below, we can see the shell truncates:

get-mailbox mcrowley | select emailaddresses

While there are ways (example1, example2) to manipulate this output on the screen, I recently needed to create a complete list of all users possessing one or more secondary email address, and document what those addresses were.

On the surface, this sounds simple.  We want a list of users who have more than 1 proxy address.  At first, I thought of something like this:

Get-Mailbox -Filter {emailaddresses -gt 1} | Select EmailAddresses

Get-Mailbox -Filter {emailaddresses -gt 1} | Select EmailAddresses

But we can see this doesn’t actually capture the correct users.  In the above example, LiveUser1 only has a single proxy address, but it was returned anyway.  This is because the result is actually converted to a number, and the “-gt” or “greater than” operation is done on this number; not what we want.

I have written a script to help!

Features:

  1. This script creates a CSV output of everyone’s SMTP proxy addresses.
  2. Reports to the screen the total number of users found.
  3. Reports to the screen the user(s) with the most proxy addresses.
  4. You can configure the threshold of users reported. For example, if you only wanted users with 2 or more proxy addresses included, you should change the line: “$Threshold = 0” to “$Threshold = 2”

Misc:

  1. Does not currently work with Exchange Online (planned enhancement).
  2. This uses “get-recipient” with no filters by default.  You may want to  replace this with something more restrictive, like “get-mailbox”, or use the -filter parameter.
  3. Requires PS 2.0 (for Exchange 2007, see here)

Here is a sample output, shown in excel:

Sample output to screen:

The guts of this script might help with this exact scenario, or really, anywhere you want to break out and evaluate multi-valued attributes.  Feel free to use it and adjust as you see fit!

Download the script here, or copy from the text below:

&lt;#

Features:
    1) This script Creates a TXT and CSV file with the following information:
        a) TXT file: Recipient Address Statistics
        b) CSV file: Output of everyone's SMTP proxy addresses.

Instructions:
    1) Run this from &quot;regular&quot; PowerShell.  Exchange Management Shell may cause problems, especially in Exchange 2010, due to PSv2.
    2) Usage: RecipientReportv5.ps1 server5.domain.local

Requirements:
    1) Exchange 2010 or 2013
    2) PowerShell 4.0

 
April 4 2015
Mike Crowley
 
http://BaselineTechnologies.com
 
#&gt;

param(
    [parameter(Position=0,Mandatory=$true,ValueFromPipeline=$false,HelpMessage='Type the name of a Client Access Server')][string]$ExchangeFQDN
    )

if ($host.version.major -le 2) {
    Write-Host &quot;&quot;
    Write-Host &quot;This script requires PowerShell 3.0 or later.&quot; -ForegroundColor Red
    Write-Host &quot;Note: Exchange 2010's EMC always runs as version 2.  Perhaps try launching PowerShell normally.&quot; -ForegroundColor Red
    Write-Host &quot;&quot;
    Write-Host &quot;Exiting...&quot; -ForegroundColor Red
    Sleep 3
    Exit
    }


if ((Test-Connection $ExchangeFQDN -Count 1 -Quiet) -ne $true) {
    Write-Host &quot;&quot;
    Write-Host (&quot;Cannot connect to: &quot; + $ExchangeFQDN) -ForegroundColor Red
    Write-Host &quot;&quot;
    Write-Host &quot;Exiting...&quot; -ForegroundColor Red
    Sleep 3
    Exit
    }

cls

 
#Misc variables
#$ExchangeFQDN = &quot;exchserv1.domain1.local&quot;
$ReportTimeStamp = (Get-Date -Format s) -replace &quot;:&quot;, &quot;.&quot;
$TxtFile = &quot;$env:USERPROFILE\Desktop\&quot; + $ReportTimeStamp + &quot;_RecipientAddressReport_Part_1of2.txt&quot;
$CsvFile = &quot;$env:USERPROFILE\Desktop\&quot; + $ReportTimeStamp + &quot;_RecipientAddressReport_Part_2of2.csv&quot;

#Connect to Exchange
Write-Host (&quot;Connecting to &quot; + $ExchangeFQDN + &quot;...&quot;) -ForegroundColor Cyan
Get-PSSession | Where-Object {$_.ConfigurationName -eq 'Microsoft.Exchange'} | Remove-PSSession
$Session = @{
    ConfigurationName = 'Microsoft.Exchange'
    ConnectionUri = 'http://' + $ExchangeFQDN + '/PowerShell/?SerializationLevel=Full' 
    Authentication = 'Kerberos'
    }
Import-PSSession (New-PSSession @Session) 

#Get Data
Write-Host &quot;Getting data from Exchange...&quot; -ForegroundColor Cyan
$AcceptedDomains = Get-AcceptedDomain
$InScopeRecipients = @(
    'DynamicDistributionGroup'
    'UserMailbox'
    'MailUniversalDistributionGroup'
    'MailUniversalSecurityGroup'
    'MailNonUniversalGroup'
    'PublicFolder'
    )
$AllRecipients = Get-Recipient -recipienttype $InScopeRecipients -ResultSize unlimited | select name, emailaddresses, RecipientType
$UniqueRecipientDomains = ($AllRecipients.emailaddresses | Where {$_ -like 'smtp*'}) -split '@' | where {$_ -NotLike 'smtp:*'} | select -Unique

Write-Host &quot;Preparing Output 1 of 2...&quot; -ForegroundColor Cyan
#Output address stats
$TextBlock = @(
    &quot;Total Number of Recipients: &quot; + $AllRecipients.Count
    &quot;Number of Dynamic Distribution Groups: &quot; +         ($AllRecipients | Where {$_.RecipientType -eq 'DynamicDistributionGroup'}).Count
    &quot;Number of User Mailboxes: &quot; + 	                    ($AllRecipients | Where {$_.RecipientType -eq 'UserMailbox'}).Count
    &quot;Number of Mail-Universal Distribution Groups: &quot; + 	($AllRecipients | Where {$_.RecipientType -eq 'MailUniversalDistributionGroup'}).Count
    &quot;Number of Mail-UniversalSecurity Groups: &quot; + 	    ($AllRecipients | Where {$_.RecipientType -eq 'MailUniversalSecurityGroup'}).Count
    &quot;Number of Mail-NonUniversal Groups: &quot; + 	        ($AllRecipients | Where {$_.RecipientType -eq 'MailNonUniversalGroup'}).Count
    &quot;Number of Public Folders: &quot; + 	                    ($AllRecipients | Where {$_.RecipientType -eq 'PublicFolder'}).Count
    &quot;&quot;
    &quot;Number of Accepted Domains: &quot; + $AcceptedDomains.count 
    &quot;&quot;
    &quot;Number of domains found on recipients: &quot; + $UniqueRecipientDomains.count 
    &quot;&quot;
    $DomainComparrison = Compare-Object $AcceptedDomains.DomainName $UniqueRecipientDomains
    &quot;These domains have been assigned to recipients, but are not Accepted Domains in the Exchange Organization:&quot;
    ($DomainComparrison | Where {$_.SideIndicator -eq '=&gt;'}).InputObject 
    &quot;&quot;
    &quot;These Accepted Domains are not assigned to any recipients:&quot; 
    ($DomainComparrison | Where {$_.SideIndicator -eq '&lt;='}).InputObject
    &quot;&quot;
    &quot;See this CSV for a complete listing of all addresses: &quot; + $CsvFile
    )

Write-Host &quot;Preparing Output 2 of 2...&quot; -ForegroundColor Cyan

$RecipientsAndSMTPProxies = @()
$CounterWatermark = 1
 
$AllRecipients | ForEach-Object {
    
    #Create a new placeholder object
    $RecipientOutputObject = New-Object PSObject -Property @{
        Name = $_.Name
        RecipientType = $_.RecipientType
        SMTPAddress0 =  ($_.emailaddresses | Where {$_ -clike 'SMTP:*'} ) -replace &quot;SMTP:&quot;
        }    
    
    #If applicable, get a list of other addresses for the recipient
    if (($_.emailaddresses).count -gt '1') {       
        $OtherAddresses = @()
        $OtherAddresses = ($_.emailaddresses | Where {$_ -clike 'smtp:*'} ) -replace &quot;smtp:&quot;
        
        $Counter = $OtherAddresses.count
        if ($Counter -gt $CounterWatermark) {$CounterWatermark = $Counter}
        $OtherAddresses | ForEach-Object {
            $RecipientOutputObject | Add-Member -MemberType NoteProperty -Name (“SmtpAddress” + $Counter) -Value ($_ -replace &quot;smtp:&quot;)
            $Counter--
            }
        }
        $RecipientsAndSMTPProxies += $RecipientOutputObject
    }
  
 
$AttributeList = @(
    'Name'
    'RecipientType'
    )
$AttributeList += 0..$CounterWatermark | ForEach-Object {&quot;SMTPAddress&quot; + $_}


Write-Host &quot;Saving report files to your desktop:&quot; -ForegroundColor Green
Write-Host &quot;&quot;
Write-Host $TxtFile -ForegroundColor Green
Write-Host $CsvFile -ForegroundColor Green

$TextBlock | Out-File $TxtFile
$RecipientsAndSMTPProxies | Select $AttributeList | sort RecipientType, Name | Export-CSV $CsvFile -NoTypeInformation

Write-Host &quot;&quot;
Write-Host &quot;&quot;
Write-Host &quot;Report Complete!&quot; -ForegroundColor Green